Fishing in a Sea of SharksReconstruction and development in the South African fishing industry Bjørn Hersoug

With the first democratic elections of 1994 the Apartheid State of South Africa came to an end. Political and economic reforms were badly needed, also in the fishing sector, as ownership to vessels, quotas and processing plants was highly skewed in favor of the white minority. Starting with a broad-based Fisheries Policy Development Committee in 1994, South Africa finally got its new Marine Living Resources Act in 1998. Based on this Act redistribution could start, aiming at creating more equal access. However, results soon turned out to be different from anticipated.

With the first democratic elections of 1994 the Apartheid State of South Africa came to an end. Political and economic reforms were badly needed, also in the fishing sector, as ownership to vessels, quotas and processing plants was highly skewed in favor of the white minority. Starting with a broad-based Fisheries Policy Development Committee in 1994, South Africa finally got its new Marine Living Resources Act in 1998. Based on this Act redistribution could start, aiming at creating more equal access. However, results soon turned out to be different from anticipated.

Fishing in a Sea of Sharks sets out to explain the transformation process from 1994 onwards, focusing on allocation – who got what? – and what the new entrants did with their quotas. By following the process on central level as well as in a number of selected fishing communities the book aims at presenting both a ‘topdown’ and a ‘bottom-up’ perspective. Fishing in a Sea of Sharks also attempts to give the first coherent presentation of the reform process and should therefore be of interest for academics as well as administrators in the field of fisheries management.

This book contains chapters written in co-authorship with Moenieba Isaacs, Petter Holm, Tsakane Khosa and Marfa Hara.

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